Ask Ted!

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1,199 thoughts on “Ask Ted!

  1. I have a 2-story property in Huntington Beach, California that was built in 1964. It was renovated in 2017. Starting last December, two sections of the property is showing excessive condensation and moisture accumulation. This condensation problem is mainly on the north facing areas. One area is on the first floor, and the other area is on the second floor, and these areas are not on top of each other. I am using a 50 pint dehumidifier and DampRid closet hangers to absorb the excess moisture continuously, but I want to know what is the cause of this so I can fix it. I greatly appreciate any feedback. Thank you.

    • Huntington Beach has a very mild climate, so it’s surprising that you’re having condensation problems.
      What surfaces is the condensation forming on?
      It’s common for people to develop condensation issues after a renovation due to the improved construction which makes a home “tighter.” The tightness is good, but that also means one has to be careful about uniform insulation and reducing interior humidity sources.
      Condensation will form on the colder surfaces in a house. Often, that’s windows, which is almost unavoidable if there’s excess moisture in colder climates. In your climate, it’s less common.
      I’d do a couple of things
      1 – check for interior moisture sources. Most common is showers that aren’t properly vented. I always recommend checking the bath fan for good suction at the intake. Then, make sure the fan runs during the shower and for at least 15-30 minutes after you finish showering in order to remove the excess moisture.
      2 – monitor the humidity in those rooms where condensation is occurring. You can get these on Amazon so cheaply – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07QMZL448/
      If you find the humidity in those rooms rises up past 60%, you know there’s too much moisture in the air under most circumstances. During the summer, it can be hard to keep it down.

      I checked the daily humidity numbers for your area in December and they were very high – 60%-80% for many days. If you open the windows, especially at night or early morning when the humidity is very high, the house will fill with moisture which will condense easily. Unfortunately, that’s unavoidable. The humidity drops quickly as the day warms so you can flush out the extra humidity by opening up the house on non-humid days in the afternoon. But it can be a tough battle in your climate.

      I’d start with those little humidity gauges placed throughout the house. See what the indoor humidity is like and if it is associated with any particular usage patterns, like opening windows or showering or cooking. Keep using dehumidifiers when the house is closed up, that might be your only solution during the colder months. During the summer, running the air conditioner will suck the moisture out of the air quickly.

      Hope that helps.

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