Removing water from carpets or rugs after a flood

Now that you’ve survived a storm, the water has receded and you’ve got your power back, what next? In all likelihood, you’re probably dealing with a wet rug or carpeting and dreading the idea of tearing it all up and throwing it away. But do you really need to do this? The answer is, “it depends.”

If your flood was caused by a stream or river, chances are you’ve got mounds of mud in your basement. While this silt may be great for growing crops, it’s really bad for carpets and the amount of money you’d have to spend cleaning up is probably greater than what it would cost to rip it out and buy it new after your basement has dried out. In addition, there’s a good chance that the water was polluted and maybe smelly, so you probably want to get it out of your home ASAP!

On the other hand, if the water was relatively clean, and your house doesn’t yet smell like a wet dog, you might be able to salvage the carpet. But it really depends upon the situation.

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April showers bring May flowers, August storms bring…roof leaks!

Summer rains bring flooding

There’s nothing like a gentle Springtime rain. But Summer often brings us torrential downpours, and along with them, roof leaks, incredible moisture and mold!

A few days ago, we had record rainfalls in Eastern Pennsylvania – five inches of rain in some areas. This fortunately came after an extended dry spell, so the rivers didn’t flood this time. We got really lucky.

These heavy rains often bring high winds, fallen branches and roof damage. Sometimes, they’ll just lead to enough leaking for you to notice. Maybe there’s a discoloration on your ceiling or window jamb. Whatever the sign, please pay attention. Failure to deal with a “small” leak now can lead to thousands or tens of thousands of dollars of damage to your house later. Worse, the accompanying mold can pose a severe health/allergy risk.

When dealing with leaks, you need to take several steps in order to minimize the chance of more serious damage to your home:

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The best way to insulate your attic – part 2

Wow, where's that hole go?

In the first installment on attic insulation, I discussed why it can be dangerous to add insulation to your attic without air sealing the attic floor first. Moisture can slip through tiny cracks in the attic floor and lead to rotten roofs. Given this information, we walked through the process of finding and sealing all those insidious air leaks in your attic, some easy, some difficult. But finally, after fixing all these problems, you could lay more insulation down on your attic floor, more confident that doing so wouldn’t lead to a humid, moldy attic.

But what if there’s an easier way?

Whether you’re building a new house or retrofitting an older one, you can make life much easier on yourself by using professionally applied spray foam insulation that air seals and insulates in one shot. There are two ways of doing this, each with their own benefits and disadvantages. We’re going to review both methods. One is spraying foam on the attic floor, instead of using loose fill or batt insulation. The other is spraying foam under the roof deck. Continue reading

What does it mean if your fiberglass insulation is black?

Insulation filters the air leaks from your house, showing you signs of energy loss

You might have noticed some black insulation in your attic or maybe around the perimeter of your basement, where the house rests on the foundation. What does this mean? Is it moldy? Wet? Why is the insulation black?

In fact, black insulation is the energy auditor’s best friend because it tells us where the problems are. In just a few minutes of looking around the attic, you can find the most serious air leaks from the house. Here’s why…

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Cathedral Ceilings – Mold and Moisture – Problems and Solutions

Rotten roof deck

Disclaimer: while I think all the information presented here is accurate and scientifically valid, you are advised to consult a *professional before changing your home. This article covers just one component of your home. Your specific home may have conditions that override the comments contained herein.

*By professional, I mean an experienced building scientist, not your local carpenter or roofer or even a structural engineer or architect. While many of these people are artists in what they do, most have no training in building science or engineering and cannot be trusted to properly design a roof assembly. Likewise, you wouldn’t hire a building scientist to swing a hammer and build your roof!
Cathedral ceilings are very popular – they give rooms a feeling of openness and an added aesthetic dimension. At the same time, they are responsible for a variety of building problems and homeowner heartbreak. What causes these problems and how do you avoid them?

There are a variety of climate zones. The south-eastern United States is hot and humid, while the north east is cold. The mid-Atlantic states, where I live, is mixed – during the summer it is hot and humid, during the winter it is cold. The south west is mostly hot and dry and the northwest is moderate in temperature but very humid! Each of these climate zones has its own particular building details. However, all must follow the laws of physics.

Physics tells us that moisture moves from areas of high humidity to areas of low humidity. If it’s more humid outside, moisture wants to come in. And when it’s more humid inside, the moisture will move toward the outside. Simple!

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If you saw smoke coming from the wall, you’d call the fire department and evacuate the house.

If you saw smoke coming from the wall, you’d call the fire department and evacuate the house. So why, when you see water dripping from the ceiling, do you put a bucket under it, and let it destroy your home just as surely as the fire would, just more slowly?

This is just a quick thought for the day. Water can be extremely damaging, but it seems so innocuous that people often ignore it until it destroys their home or their family’s health. Take every drip seriously – imagine that each drip is a puff of smoke coming from a hidden fire.

Got Mold? Part 3 – a flood doesn’t have to be the end of the world

By now, you’re probably terrified of water, and well you should be – it is a silent destroyer of homes. On the other hand, I don’t want anybody freaking out because they spilled a bucket or even a glass of water on the floor!

Mold doesn’t grow instantly. It needs time, water, and sometimes warmth. I’ve seen plenty of cases where people have had a serious flood in their homes – perhaps a toilet or sink flooded a bathroom, but these resulted in no mold. Why? Because the water was cleaned up quickly and everything was allowed to dry out.

The danger is when you let water or condensation get trapped somewhere. For example, I see this a lot – house-plants causing rotten wood, like shown above. There was a huge house plant sitting in a plastic pot. The pot didn’t leak, but periodically, somebody might spill a little water which would go under the pot and get trapped. Over time, it totally ruined the oak floor.

Trapped water is bad. Water left to evaporate is usually harmless.

Most of the mold and water damage I’ve seen occurs over a long period. Weeks, months or even years of neglect. So it usually isn’t a surprise when you find problems. However, like the proverbial slowly boiling frog, we often ignore a “little” condensation or a puddle of water. But, these are exactly the things that cause you to wake up one day and find that your window sash has rotted out.

A little moisture over a long period can cause serious damage.

Let’s look at a few scenarios and classify them as bad or not-so-bad.

Scenario 1:

Your toilet or sink overflows, but you catch it quickly. Maybe a couple buckets worth of water floods your bathroom.

First off, any time you have a water spill, the first thing to do is to clean up all the water (duh)! If you have a wet-use shop-vac, you can put it great use. Shop vacs do a wonderful job of cleaning up spills because they’ll suck the water off the floor and out of nooks and crannies. If you don’t, then use a sponge mop and soak up all the water.

When you’re done with the bulk of the cleanup, use an old towel to dry everything as well as you can.

Often, this simple cleanup will be enough if you catch the leak before it has a chance to really soak in. So beyond this, just run the bath fan for a few hours to flush out the moisture in the air or run a big floor fan in the doorway. 

All told, this type of “water event” can be pretty harmless. 

Scenario 1a:

You flood the bathroom with enough water that it drips out the ceiling or light fixtures in the floor below. 

This could mean trouble. In most homes, you have the finish flooring, with a wood sub-floor underneath. This sits on the floor joists. Underneath, the ceiling material, usually sheet-rock, is nailed or screwed to the underside of the joists. If the water flooded down to the floor below, that means that a substantial amount is likely in this space around the floor joists which you can’t get to in order to dry it out.

As in scenario 1, you want to immediately clean up the water above. Forget the floor below (yet) – stop the water above from coming down! If you clean up the water and get the bathroom drying out, that will help the water evaporate and allow all the building materials to dry out. Remember – water “wants” to move from wet to dry areas.

However, your work isn’t done yet. There’s a good chance that your sheet-rock will pull away from the nails/screws that hold it up. When it gets wet, sheet-rock will turn to mush. Don’t touch it or you may destroy it. You also run the risk of having the ceiling collapse on your head.

The best thing to do is clean up all the visible water from the bathroom and the floor below and then put dehumidifiers in both rooms. Let them run for a couple of days. You literally want to suck the moisture out of the building materials as fast as possible.

If you’re a professional and have good toys, you can use a moisture meter. I have a few of these. They let me scan behind walls and ceilings without having to take everything apart. There are two types – the pin type, which is generally more accurate but requires that you stick the probes into the material, and non-destructive, which works on the electrical properties of the material which change with water content.

The problem is, if you don’t have one of these meters, you really don’t know how much water remains in the ceiling cavity. If that water isn’t totally dried out quickly, you’ll probably have mold growing in there. You will be very unlikely to have wood rot however because the water will get soaked up and evaporate over time so the conditions for continued mold and related problems decreases over time.

The question is, if you do get a little mold in there, is that a problem?

Before I answer, if you have any doubts whatsoever about you or your own family’s sensitivities to mold, contact a professional. Without actually examining your home, there is no definitive information that anybody can give you. In other words, if you choose not to have a professional evaluate your problem and your house collapses or you die of mold allergies – don’t blame me!

There is a school of thought that as long as you get rid of the water let the mold grow in the first place, you don’t want to mess with it, especially if it’s safely trapped in the walls or ceiling.

What would I do? When I’ve had situations like this in my own home, usually after I’ve dried things out, I will cut a hole in the ceiling – maybe 16” square. Large enough to poke my head into and check things out. Sheet-rock is easy to patch, and you’re better safe than sorry. Though now that I’ve got those excellent moisture meters, if they indicate that it’s dry in there, I don’t worry about it.

Scenario 2: 

You’ve had a flood that you didn’t discover for a couple weeks.

This is bad news, really bad. I’ve seen homes totaled by this. Seriously.

This typically occurs when a pipe bursts in a vacation home. Or a rat chews through the water lines of your dishwasher or washing machine. The water pours out, gallons every minute, for the entire time. It’s horrible. Thousands of gallons flooding into every corner of the house, soaking into the carpets, up the walls, into every cavity.

In a situation like this, the only solution is to call in a water damage specialist. Hopefully your insurance will cover this, because it will cost thousands of dollars and take potentially weeks to dry out your home and determine if it’s habitable.

Here’s what they’ll do.

First, as in any of these situations, they’ll turn off the water to ensure that no more water enters. Next they’ll remove the “bulk water” so that it can’t cause further damage. This is the easy stuff.

Next, they’ll probably want to remove all the water soaked materials. This might include sofas, carpets, beds, anything that is wet and holding moisture. If they leave these giant wet sponges in the house, it will be extremely difficult to dry out the house.

After that, they’ll use industrial strength dehumidifiers and fans to dry out the air. The fans help to evaporate the water and the dehumidifiers suck the humidity out of the air. 

If you’re lucky, they’ll make measurements using meters like I mentioned above, and they’ll determine that the interstitial spaces (i.e. inside the walls and floors) are dry. However, with this type of flood, it is extremely likely that the insides of the walls and floors will be saturated with water. This can be extremely difficult/impossible to dry out without opening up the walls.

As you can see, this is really serious. If you encounter this type of scenario, don’t mess with it!